Court Reporting

Court Reporting

Looking for a realtime court reporter for your next deposition? Need a videographer? Does your deposition require a court reporter knowledgeable in handling multi-party, multi-venue, complicated cases?

Barkley Court Reporters will have you covered anywhere across the globe. Plus, complimentary conference rooms at our offices and affiliates nationwide.

For more than 40 years Barkley Court Reporters has remained focused on providing the most experienced, technically trained reporters in the industry and delivering the related technology and services to make your depositions and hearings run smoothly. Our court reporters average between three to 20 plus years of experience. Many specialize in practice areas such as business, medical malpractice, intellectual property, construction defect, real estate, international, and employment law litigation. We also have court reporters that can help you with introducing exhibits electronically.

Barkley court reporters are the reporters of choice--for the Golden Globes, the Emmy Awards and the Television
Critics Association, as well as most leading law firms.

Schedule a deposition with us today. Let us show you our commitment to becoming your preferred provider of court reporting and related services.

Realtime Court Reporting Services

Realtime is the act of connecting directly to a court reporter during a deposition or in court and seeing the transcript of the testimony as it is being recorded “in real time. Think of it as live closed captioning with which you can interact.

Many transcript management programs like West Law Case Notebook (with the LiveNote realtime software) and Lexis-Nexus Text Map or Summation come with realtime viewing technology that enables you see as well as annotate your transcript in realtime or after the deposition. These realtime programs allow you to keyword search, highlight testimony, create and mark issues, as well as run reports. Free software for viewing realtime also is available, such as Stenographs CaseView Net for PC and iCVNet for iPad or Advantage Softwares Bridge Mobile software.

Realtime viewed on your iPad using iCVNet can only be viewed, highlighted and searched. However, at the end of your deposition it can be imported to CaseView Net on your PC where you can also mark issues as well as run reports. Bridge Mobile enables you to see realtime on any mobile device, as well as on your desk or laptop. It is available either as a free app (iOS and Android) or via a secure Bridge Mobile webpage. All Bridge Mobile versions allow for searching, highlighting and annotating testimony.

Regardless of what realtime software is used, you can download and email the rough draft of your transcript to yourself at the end of your deposition so the deponent's testimony is available to you immediately following the deposition. Many attorneys find this to be particularly valuable when taking back-to-back depositions in a case since they can then readily refer to testimony given by other deponents. Using realtime also allows you to avoid asking your reporter to recite testimony given earlier in the deposition saving time in the deposition room and giving you more control. You also can discreetly mark lines of testimony for follow up later in the deposition.

Tips for Ordering Realtime

  • Specifically request that a realtime reporter be provided for your deposition.
  • If you use LiveNote software or West Law Case Notebook, specify that you need a reporter with LiveNote.
  • If colleagues may be arriving late to the deposition, ask for a court reporter who can provide Realtime in Reserve so colleagues can see the entire transcript regardless of when they join your deposition.
  • If you'd like to see the realtime on a particular device, inform your court reporting agency.

When Ordering Realtime, it is understood that you will:

  • Purchase the final certified transcript at the prevailing rate; and
  • Pay applicable fees associated with streaming the realtime transcript

Have questions about using realtime at your next depositions?